Your streets should be free from unnecessary clutter...

...and the street furniture and signs should be clear and in good condition

Street furniture

All fences, rails, barriers, bollards, sign posts, street name plates, cycle racks, litter bins, parking “pay and display” machines, and seating ought to meet the following criteria:

  • Properly aligned (ie upright and not a safety hazard)
  • Pointing in the correct direction
  • Structurally sound
  • Fixed appropriately and securely to the ground
  • Free of rust or corrosion that affects structural integrity
  • Free of significant dents or other damage (with reported graffiti, fly-posting or stickers removed)
  • Free of unauthorised or out-of-date signage or other items (such as abandoned cycle locks/chains and cable ties/jubilee clips).  

Signs

Signage must be clean, bright, unobscured, mounted at the correct height and facing in the correct direction.

Signage will be replaced or removed if it is found to be significantly faded, damaged, corroded or out of date. 

Temporary signs

Temporary signs attached (eg local planning notices, temporary traffic orders, other public or promotional notices) attached to street furniture or lamp columns must be clearly written, legible, and appropriate to the area.

They must also be taken down, along with the associated fixings (e.g. cable-ties), as soon as possible following any stated expiry date.

Illuminated bollards and signals

All illuminated bollards or traffic signage must also be structurally sound with fully working lamps/lanterns and covers (although note that they will not be illuminated during daylight hours).

All reflective and solar-powered bollards must also meet these same quality standards to ensure maximum visibility and public safety.

Pedestrian crossing signals should be in full working order and kept clean, well-painted and undamaged. All traffic signals (these are maintained by TfL), should be clearly visible from approaches, and not obstructed by signage, banners, hanging baskets etc.

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Last updated: 9 August 2016
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